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Old 11-15-2012, 12:01 PM
rbratcherjr rbratcherjr is offline
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Default Edible wild plants?

Anybody planning to use the edible wild plants during mid trib or later? I've been watching this series of Youtube video's to learn as much as I can about wild edible plants.

http://www.youtube.com/user/EatTheWeeds/videos?view=0
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Old 03-20-2016, 01:35 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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Thanks! Look at all those videos! I love this topic. Did research in HS on it, and served some to friends n family (who were not so thrilled). Keep books around but haven't eaten much lately.

Trivia
  • Cattail bases like celery (not efficient use of plant) and seeds for flour
  • Purslane and a few other common low weeds, great with stir fry.
  • Chicory
  • Almost anything that looks and smells like an onion plant is safe to use like an onion (Don't quote me in the hospital)
  • Watch out for the tasty citrusy things like oxalis -- too much oxalic acid can damage kidneys.
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  #3  
Old 03-21-2016, 06:59 PM
Doug_C Doug_C is offline
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Above YouTube link didn't work for me.

This one does (it's a whole channel):

https://www.youtube.com/user/EatTheWeeds
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  #4  
Old 03-22-2016, 05:45 PM
RADONE RADONE is offline
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Missouri Conservation Dept. puts out a wild edibles book in pdf. form. I have it downloaded. Unfortunately the hard copy version has been out of print for years. The biggest drawback, half of the pictures are in black and white.

Many of the things my goats love I can eat too. But not everything. They love poison ivy more that chicory, clover etc.
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Old 03-22-2016, 06:19 PM
1savedbygrace 1savedbygrace is offline
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Default edible wildcrafting

We have really lost touch with the gifts the Lord has provided for us.
Don't forget

*Dandelions (makes great tea, you can dry the roots and make coffee!)
*Red clover also makes lovely tea, good for all kinds of things
*Chicory- often found on the side of the roads , I actually grow chicory in my herb garden, it is wonderful in tea
Golden Rod- I grow this, but it is found growing wild all over, it is great tonic, tea, & tincture, good for liver, kidney stones and other ailments


There is a long list of delicious wild edibles.
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Old 03-22-2016, 09:26 PM
1savedbygrace 1savedbygrace is offline
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Default thought of a couple more

There are SO many, I just thought of a couple more:

Nettles! Stinging nettle is SO dense in nutrition. For anyone who is malnourished, nettles contain so many vitamins & minerals, and some like vitamin K are hard to come by in other natural sources.

Mullein. Found along roadsides, mullein is one of those many consider a "weed" but it has many herbal benefits.
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Old 03-23-2016, 04:19 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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Quote:
Many of the things my goats love I can eat too. But not everything.
Clothes, hats, that sort of thing.
There are whole books full of edible wild plants.

Euell Gibbons wrote popular ones in the 60's and 70's. He used to eat a little poison ivy every day to make himself resistant to the rash. (Do not try this at home.) It's also in homeopathic formulas like Hylan's muscle relaxers.
But.. tea and salads...

A side topic --Paul Stamets healing with fungi.
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Old 03-23-2016, 06:08 PM
FamousMatt FamousMatt is offline
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Many of the nuisance weeds we have encounter throughout life are actually one of the most nutrient rich plants for you. As long as you dont use weed killer on them. We have weeds that grow in our garden here in minnesota that are really good for salads. These things grow like crazy. Make sure the weeds you eat come from an area that isnt sprayed by pesticides/herbicides. Also weeds certain weeds are indicators of soil deficiency.

I would highly suggest getting a wild edibles book though. We have at least 2 in our household. They are like $20- $30 at the most. Another good book to have is one about wild mushrooms. Just so you know which ones to pick (dont want poisonous ones). Mushrooms are also super nutrient rich.
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  #9  
Old 05-03-2016, 02:55 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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The MO book was divided into multiple downloads.
http://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-na...ibles-missouri

A couple other links:

http://www.wikihow.com/Find-Wild-Edible-Plants

http://www.wilderness-survival.net/plants-1.php

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/08/0...s-you-can-eat/

(Remember not to gather greens where someone might have sprayed weed killer.)
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  #10  
Old 07-10-2016, 03:47 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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After buying a lot of fenugreek leaves and planting them bc they taste great, I realized many of the plants in the Fabacae/legume family are edible.

Alfalfa, peas and beans, peanut, locust, soy, carob, ("licorice"?)... not just the seeds but the greens. Check first, of course.

http://honest-food.net/2013/08/22/th...he-poison-pea/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabaceae
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