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  #1  
Old 02-18-2016, 05:27 PM
Sky Pilot Sky Pilot is offline
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Default For those who don't know!

How to Use a Compass!

http://www.survivalsullivan.com/how-to-use-a-compass/
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  #2  
Old 03-11-2016, 02:47 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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Hey, thanks for thinking of that. I've barely used one since scouts.

(The article author does not sound fun to hike with, but knows their way around.)

It could also be useful to know how your house relates to the poles. A house on a diagonal road might feel like it's perpendicular to NSEW directions, while we make assumptions -- but actually being way off our guess.

My neighbor had a weather vane that I thought for years was not working, until I realized it was me that was off.

Last edited by kestrel; 03-11-2016 at 03:22 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-29-2016, 03:07 PM
kestrel kestrel is offline
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I was driving around back roads where homes were half a mile apart, and realized I should have a compass in my car -- now, not in prep. I'd jotted down most of the main roads, but OY! when you have to drive a couple miles just to see the name of the next road, you want to make sure you're going north not south.

Where I live, the sky is usually white and the sun is.. up there somewhere.

Hurray for compasses.
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  #4  
Old 08-03-2016, 06:27 PM
RADONE RADONE is offline
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At my last house I had a covered deck. I loved to go out and watch storms roll in. They always seemed to move at a little different angle that radar showed because my street wasn't quite EW. Using my compass I burnt NSEW into the handrail so I would always have a reference. After a few months I came to the conclusion my burnt in directional pointer can't be correct. So I got the compass out and set it on the rail a few inches from the markings. It was off. I moved it over to the markings and it agreed. There was a wood screw holding the rail together right under where I put the marks. It threw the compass off 20 deg.
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  #5  
Old 08-04-2016, 07:33 AM
Cord Cord is offline
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Good post and good article.
I would like to encourage everybody who feels navigational skills may be necessary in their future to get outside with a map and compass and go for a hike.

Map orientation and reading skills are just as important as compass reading skills.
For instance, map legends give information on magnetic declination, what the symbols mean, map scale, contour line intervals, mileage indications and so on.
Maps can steer you around private property, lead you to side trails, show elevations, water supplies and so on.

I have enjoyed much hiking and some backpacking this summer and I am not done yet.
I have been testing myself and my gear, preparing myself physically, mentally, and spiritually for the uncertain times ahead.
I would like to share some of what I have learned.

Boots, do not cheap out. High quality boots will never be a bad investment.
Socks, same as above. Good socks mean fewer foot problems.
Every step is a potential hazard, a twisted ankle (or worse) and you are done hiking.

Navigation; a good map, compass, and GPS for back up.
Yes I advise use a compass for primary navigation and the GPS as a back up, not the other way around.
GPS has inherent fallacies, they don't work in white outs or in deep canyons because they lose signals from satellites.
Batteries and electronics can fail, the compass is tried and true, I carry a smaller back up compass in case I break or lose the primary.

Get out there and test yourself, you may be surprised (or disappointed) at how far you can walk in a day.
You may learn how spooky it is to travel alone through a wilderness area, or how rewarding it can be.
You may find hiking with others can become a burden, differences and difficulties may arise and other people can quickly become liabilities rather than assets.
Absolutely always tell someone your hiking plan and schedule.

I will leave off where I started, this is a good topic and I hope It gets us all thinking.
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  #6  
Old 08-04-2016, 05:07 PM
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Serena Serena is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cord View Post
Good post and good article.
I would like to encourage everybody who feels navigational skills may be necessary in their future to get outside with a map and compass and go for a hike.

Map orientation and reading skills are just as important as compass reading skills.
For instance, map legends give information on magnetic declination, what the symbols mean, map scale, contour line intervals, mileage indications and so on.
Maps can steer you around private property, lead you to side trails, show elevations, water supplies and so on.

I have enjoyed much hiking and some backpacking this summer and I am not done yet.
I have been testing myself and my gear, preparing myself physically, mentally, and spiritually for the uncertain times ahead.
I would like to share some of what I have learned.

Boots, do not cheap out. High quality boots will never be a bad investment.
Socks, same as above. Good socks mean fewer foot problems.
Every step is a potential hazard, a twisted ankle (or worse) and you are done hiking.

Navigation; a good map, compass, and GPS for back up.
Yes I advise use a compass for primary navigation and the GPS as a back up, not the other way around.
GPS has inherent fallacies, they don't work in white outs or in deep canyons because they lose signals from satellites.
Batteries and electronics can fail, the compass is tried and true, I carry a smaller back up compass in case I break or lose the primary.

Get out there and test yourself, you may be surprised (or disappointed) at how far you can walk in a day.
You may learn how spooky it is to travel alone through a wilderness area, or how rewarding it can be.
You may find hiking with others can become a burden, differences and difficulties may arise and other people can quickly become liabilities rather than assets.
Absolutely always tell someone your hiking plan and schedule.

I will leave off where I started, this is a good topic and I hope It gets us all thinking.
I have a question about the GPS. Could you be tracked and hunted down?
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  #7  
Old 08-05-2016, 10:29 AM
Cord Cord is offline
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Default Transmitters

Yes, in fact my Garmin came with a manual and in it they stated that it does transmit my position to the GPS system.

It does not bother me because I am not hiding or doing anything wrong anyway.
Cars with OnStar, cellular phones, and portable computers transmit also, and can even be traced when they are turned off.

This is a good reason to always navigate by compass, if I come to a time when I have to ditch the electronics, I can use the device to lay a false trail.

In the meantime, I will use it to mark waypoints in case I get turned around somewhere, it does make traveling in unknown places safer.
Also, should search and rescue have to save me for any reason, they can "ping" my device from space and send my coordinates to the searchers.

In my case, I did not register my GPS device but they probably know I have that particular transponder anyway.
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