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Old 01-02-2010, 06:04 PM
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Nathan Nathan is offline
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Default 100 Items That Disappear First in a Disaster

I received this in an email:
---------------------------

100 Items That Disappear First in a Disaster

1. Generators
(Good ones cost dearly. Gas storage, risky. Noisy...target of thieves; maintenance, etc.)

2. Water Filters/Purifiers

3. Portable Toilets (Increasing in price every two months.)

4. Seasoned Firewood
(About $250 per cord; wood takes 6 - 12 mos. to become dried, for home uses.)

5. Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps
(First choice: Buy CLEAR oil. If scarce, stockpile ANY!)

6. Coleman Fuel
(URGENT $2.69-$3.99/gal. Impossible to stockpile too much.)

7. Guns, Ammunition, Pepper Spray, Knives, Clubs, Bats and Slingshots

8. Hand-Can openers and hand egg beaters, whisks (Life savers!)

9. Honey/Syrups/white, brown sugars

10. Rice - Beans - Wheat
(White rice is now $12.95 - 50# bag. Sam's Club, stock depleted often.)

11. Vegetable oil (for cooking)
(Without it food burns/must be boiled, etc.)

12. Charcoal and Lighter fluid (Will become scarce suddenly.)

13. Water containers
(Urgent Item to obtain. Any size. Small: HARD CLEAR PLASTIC ONLY)

14. Mini Heater head (Propane) (Without this item, propane won't heat a room.)

15. Grain Grinder (Non-electric)

16. Propane Cylinders

17. Michael Hyatt's Y2K Survival Guide
(BEST single y2k handbook for sound advice/tips.)

18. Mantles: Aladdin, Coleman, etc.
(Without this item, longer-term lighting is difficult.)

19. Baby Supplies: Diapers/formula/ointments/aspirin, etc

20. Washboards, Mop Bucket w/wringer (for Laundry)

21. Cook stoves (Propane, Coleman and Kerosene)

22. Vitamins (Critical, due to Y2K-forced daily canned food diets.)

23. Propane Cylinder Handle-Holder
(Urgent: Small canister use is dangerous without this item.)

24. Feminine Hygiene/Haircare/Skin products

25. Thermal underwear (Tops and bottoms)

26. Bow saws, axes and hatchets and Wedges (also, honing oil)

27. Aluminum foil (Reg. and Heavy Duty)
(Great Cooking and Barter item)

28. Gasoline containers (Plastic or Metal)

29. Garbage bags (Impossible to have too many.)

30. Toilet Paper, Kleenex, paper towels

31. Milk - Powdered and Condensed (Shake liquid every 3 to 4 months.)

32. Garden seeds (Non-hybrid) (A MUST)

33. Clothespins/line/hangers (A MUST)

34. Coleman's Pump Repair Kit: 1(800) 835-3278

35. Tuna Fish (in oil)

36. Fire extinguishers (or.. large box of Baking soda in every room...)

37. First aid kits

38. Batteries (all sizes...buy furthest-out for Expiration Dates)

39. Garlic, spices and vinegar, baking supplies

40. BIG DOGS (and plenty of dog food)

41. Flour, yeast and salt

42. Matches ("Strike Anywhere" preferred. Boxed, wooden matches will go first.)

43. Writing paper/pads/pencils/solar calculators

44. Insulated ice chests (good for keeping items from freezing in Wintertime)

45. Work boots, belts, Levis and durable shirts

46. Flashlights/Light Sticks and torches, "No.76 Dietz" Lanterns

47. Journals, Diaries and Scrapbooks
(Jot down ideas, feelings, experiences: Historic times!)

48. Garbage cans Plastic
(great for storage, water, transporting - if with wheels)

49. Men's Hygiene: Shampoo, Toothbrush/paste, Mouthwash/floss, nail clippers, etc

50. Cast iron cookware (sturdy, efficient)

51. Fishing supplies/tools

52. Mosquito coils/repellent sprays/creams

53. Duct tape

54. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes

55. Candles

56. Laundry detergent (Liquid)

57. Backpacks and Duffle bags

58. Garden tools and supplies

59. Scissors, fabrics and sewing supplies

60. Canned Fruits, Veggies, Soups, stews, etc.

61. Bleach (plain, NOT scented: 4 to 6% sodium hypochlorite)

62. Canning supplies (Jars/lids/wax)

63. Knives and Sharpening tools: files, stones, steel

64. Bicycles...Tires/tubes/pumps/chains, etc.

65. Sleeping bags and blankets/pillows/mats

66. Carbon Monoxide Alarm (battery powered)

67. Board Games Cards, Dice

68. D-Con Rat poison, MOUSE PRUFE II, Roach Killer

69. Mousetraps, Ant traps and cockroach magnets

70. Paper plates/cups/utensils (stock up, folks...)

71. Baby Wipes, oils, waterless and Anti-bacterial soap
(saves a lot of water)

72. Rain gear, rubberized boots, etc.

73. Shaving supplies
(razors and creams, talc, after shave)

74. Hand pumps and siphons
(for water and for fuels)

75. Soy sauce, vinegar, bouillons/gravy/soup base

76. Reading glasses

77. Chocolate/Cocoa/Tang/Punch (water enhancers)

78. "Survival-in-a-Can"

79. Woolen clothing, scarves/ear-muffs/mittens

80. Boy Scout Handbook – 12th Edition
(also, Leader's Catalog)

81. Roll-on Window Insulation Kit (MANCO)

82. Graham crackers, saltines, pretzels, Trail mix/Jerky

83. Popcorn, Peanut Butter, Nuts

84. Socks, Underwear, T-shirts, etc. (extras)

85. Lumber (all types)

86. Wagons and carts (for transport to and from open Flea markets)

87. Cots and Inflatable Mattresses (for extra guests)

88. Gloves: Work/warming/gardening, etc.

89. Lantern Hangers

90. Screen Patches, glue, nails, screws, nuts and bolts

91. Teas

92. Coffee

93. Cigarettes

94. Wine/Liquors (for bribes, medicinal, etc.)

95. Paraffin wax

96. Glue, nails, nuts, bolts, screws, etc.

97. Chewing gum/candies

98. Atomizers (for cooling/bathing)

99. Hats and cotton neckerchiefs

100. Goats/chickens

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/INFO_...100.items.html
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:24 AM
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CathyLeigh CathyLeigh is offline
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Thank you Nathan for posting this list. Excellent list that can easily be used as a preparation guide.
Cathy in Ohio
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Old 01-04-2010, 09:41 AM
Al Al is offline
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Very good list and worth considering. For a moment I wondered what the big deal is about the 12th edition of the Boy Scout handbook is, but then other than updated equipment, most of the info is pretty much going to be the same as my old '80's handbook and one my uncle had in the 50's that I have. In fact there are many boyscout merit badge books on certain subjects that can give basic info on survival and survival activities that are worth finding. The books can be found used at book stores and garage sales for $2 or less. Some subjects to consider are knots, wilderness survival, first aid. Here is a link to the full list: http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/TLreso.../BSAMerit.html
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Old 01-05-2010, 05:36 AM
WhiteHorseBerean WhiteHorseBerean is offline
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Quote:
11. Vegetable oil (for cooking)
(Without it food burns/must be boiled, etc.)
Kinda odd topic for this to pop in my mind, but as I read this a thought came to mind, "Without oil or water, the flesh will burn." Jesus is described as the Living Water, and oil is often used as describing the Holy Spirit in the Bible.

Thanks for the list. I think I'll start gathering as much as I can.
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Old 01-05-2010, 06:28 AM
Servant Chris Servant Chris is offline
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Morning Nathan, yes this is a good list and most of us here know it has been floating around for quite some time but it is definitely good to keep it going.

Something I would like to point out. It is important to remember that this is a list of the "First" things to run out. But not necessarily the most important for long term needs.

For example #1 is generators. I wonder how long those generators will really get to run. The biggest reason they are so important is people with money are trying to continue their current standard of life and we all know everything is run by electricity. But they require and enormous amount of fuel.
If we move down to items 25&26 "Thermal underwear" & "Bow saws, axes etc" we are starting to see people finally get into things for long term needs. They are doing this because the original items(generators) are not providing what they need over long periods of time. This is just one example and the list is full of them.

So what I would encourage people to do when looking at this list is not to think about what to get first but to think about what your true long term needs will be and be aware that any fuel products(gasoline propane diesel etc) will be very hard to secure after a collapse.

Keep things as simple as possible. Because eventually that is what it will get down to.

Chris
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Old 01-05-2010, 06:31 AM
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Quote:
11. Vegetable oil (for cooking)
(Without it food burns/must be boiled, etc.)
Well, not exactly - most animals have fat on their body, so after killing a critter, remove and save the fat for rendering down for cooking. That said, I would just have good old lard on hand.

My grandmother used to tell me during the depression, they would eat lard sandwiches due to no money. She said when nothing was available to go into the lard for cooking, they used the old, used lard that became semi hard and spread it on bread.

If I had to, I suppose, but whew!
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Old 01-05-2010, 06:38 AM
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Thank you Nathan. I bought 2 lamps that burn oil recently just in case electricity goes out. I noticed that the lamp oil if about $4.00 per quart. Someone told me to go to a hardware store and buy low odor mineral spirits by the gallon. THey said it costs a whole lot less than the oil that other stores sell for 4.00/qrt. and it works just the same if not better.

I am gonna go out and buy some of the things that you have listed. I know in my heart that things are gonna get worse with time. USA is not the same as it was years ago. I have been stocking up on food and lots of water.

God bless you and Donna and Family!!

1 Corinthians 14:8
For if the trumpet give an uncertain sound, who shall prepare himself to the battle
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Old 01-05-2010, 07:37 PM
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LightHouseMomma LightHouseMomma is offline
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I had not heard of using Low Odor Mineral Spirits has anyone tried this? I think I would be in fear of an explosion....but I suppose it's worth a try.
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Old 01-05-2010, 11:05 PM
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Man from Modesto Man from Modesto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Servant Chris View Post
Morning Nathan, yes this is a good list and most of us here know it has been floating around for quite some time but it is definitely good to keep it going.

Something I would like to point out. It is important to remember that this is a list of the "First" things to run out. But not necessarily the most important for long term needs.

For example #1 is generators. I wonder how long those generators will really get to run. The biggest reason they are so important is people with money are trying to continue their current standard of life and we all know everything is run by electricity. But they require and enormous amount of fuel.
If we move down to items 25&26 "Thermal underwear" & "Bow saws, axes etc" we are starting to see people finally get into things for long term needs. They are doing this because the original items(generators) are not providing what they need over long periods of time. This is just one example and the list is full of them.

So what I would encourage people to do when looking at this list is not to think about what to get first but to think about what your true long term needs will be and be aware that any fuel products(gasoline propane diesel etc) will be very hard to secure after a collapse.

Keep things as simple as possible. Because eventually that is what it will get down to.

Chris
Good point, Chris. It may be wiser to invest in solar panels, or wind. Small wind systems are becoming very popular in California. One windmill can power a house, lights on the barns, and still produce enough power in windy months to sell some back to the power grid.
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Old 01-06-2010, 06:47 AM
Servant Chris Servant Chris is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LightHouseMomma View Post
I had not heard of using Low Odor Mineral Spirits has anyone tried this? I think I would be in fear of an explosion....but I suppose it's worth a try.
I think I would be very cautious with the Mineral spirits.

c

[edit] Fuels


This article is written like a personal reflection or essay and may require cleanup. Please help improve it by rewriting it in an encyclopedic style. (December 2008)
The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with North America and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article and discuss the issue on the talk page.

Hot-blast kerosene lantern


Pure paraffin (wax) oil (aka Ultra-Pure, Nowell's, etc.,) is marketed as "smokeless and odorless" lamp oil, but is improperly labeled in the United States for use in wick lamps and lanterns. In fact, it will not burn properly in lamps or lanterns with 5/8" or larger wick, and will create smoke and odor. Paraffin oil has a flash point in excess of 200 degrees Fahrenheit, and will only burn half as bright as standard lamp oil or kerosene, and will sputter in lamps with deep founts, or that have 7/8" or larger wick. It is suitable for use in candle lamps, similar to those used in restaurants. Paraffin oil is not recommended for use in antique lamps or lanterns as the higher ignition temperature may result in damage to the lamp. Pure paraffin oil can solidify in environments below room temperature, greatly limiting its suitability for outdoor or emergency use. Drug store mineral oil is paraffin oil. (NOTE: "Paraffin" in the UK is "Kerosene" in the United States, and should not be confused with solid paraffin wax or the Pure "Paraffin" (wax) oil discussed above, both of which are sold in the U.S.A..)
Generic lamp oil is widely available in supermarkets and hardware stores. It is usually less expensive than pure paraffin oil, but costs considerably more than kerosene. Lamp oil burns cleaner and with less odor than kerosene. Strong odors can be caused by the design of the lamp burner and chimney. Generally, larger lamp burners emit less odor than very small burners. Stale fuel, gummy burners, and clogged dirty wicks are the cause of strong odors. If you are not using a kerosene lamp regularly, empty if of kerosene, clean and wash the font wick and burner. Store kerosene away from sunlight in a cool dark place, not longer than a year or so, as it will eventually deteriorate. Familiarize yourself with the symptoms and smells of fresh kerosene and stale kerosene. Stale kerosene smells like furniture polish, and takes on a deep yellow color, or darker.
K-1 Kerosene(clear as water, or slightly yellow) is more easily available in bulk than lamp oil in most countries and is typically much cheaper. However, kerosene contains more impurities such as sulfur and aromatic hydrocarbons than lamp oil. Kerosene obtained from filling stations is more likely to be dyed red, or contaminated with water than kerosene obtained in prepackaged containers. The odors produced by burning kerosene in wick lamps can be quite objectionable indoors, unless the kerosene is fresh; the lamp, wick, and burner are kept scrupulously clean, and the lamp burner is adjusted properly.
Red Kerosene is slightly less expensive than K-1 Kerosene, as no road taxes are collected on it. It is generally available in bulk at filling stations in agricultural areas for use in farm tractors or Diesel generators. Never put it in your diesel car, as steep fines can result.
Kleen-Heat-a cleaner burning, nicer smelling Kerosene substitute, Sold at hardware stores during winter.
Biodiesel is a clean burning "green" alternative to kerosene. Biodiesel packaged for lamp burning is best purchased to avoid biodiesel / diesel mixtures available at the majority of biodiesel gas pumps.
Citronella oil can be burned in wick lamps outdoors, but will produce some smoke and soot, and will foul the wick quickly, and may be easily extinguished by a slight breeze if flame is exposed (as in a yard torch). To improve wick life and make citronella burn cleaner, it can be mixed 50:50 with kerosene. The residue from burning citronella oil is difficult to remove, so it is not recommended for use in kerosene lamps or lanterns.
Motor Kerosene or Tractor Vaporizing Oil, very hard to find nowadays, try to find it at a feed store or near a farming community. This can be used, but use it sparingly, it may be expensive.
Sometimes dyes and fragrances are added to fuels which can increase soot deposits on glass globes/chimneys, and reduce wick life. Some manufactures have even created special novelty formulations that will cause the flame to burn a different color.
[edit] Emergency Substitutes

Kerosene lamps under ideal conditions should only be operated with kerosene or lamp oil, but alternative fuels may be used in an emergency.
Whale Oil burns incredibly bright, but is extremely hard to come by due to whaling regulations in most of the world.
Mineral spirits aka "Paint Thinner" has a flash point of 110 degrees Fahrenheit, making it highly flammable and possibly explosive. It should not be used in any wick lamps or lanterns.
Diesel fuel and home heating oil has a flash point greater than 200 degrees Fahrenheit, and will not burn properly in conventional wick lamps/lanterns. Most Diesel fuels have a fairly high sulfur content and contain fuel additives that produce toxic by-products if burned in a lamp. They also produce more soot than kerosene.
Jet A is safe to use, it is essentially kerosene with a few harmless additives, does burn great in wick lamps.
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